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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> they'll join us towards the end of the show. in the meantime, we start with the fox news alert because a deadly helicopter crash overnight leaving nine servicemen dead. it's unclear if any of the dead are americans. according to nato, four others were hurt including an american civilian. the crash happened in a province that's a taliban strong hold. the f.b.i. on its way to fort bliss, texas now where a gunman shot two women at a convenience store. the women believed to be clerks are being treated at a local hospital. military police shot the gunman dead. we don't know the identity of the shooter just yet. congress delaying a vote now on a bill to give $7.4 billion to first responders who got sick after the attacks of september 11th. a vote was expected this week but republicans objected to senator harry reid's addition of two amendments including the dream act that provides amnesty to illegal immigrants. those are your headlines. amnesty not to all illegal immigrants but to students who go to college or those who enter the military and here for five years. >> i believe senator hatch c
up, what are we going to do, give up, stop fighting? >> thank you for joining us today. we're hoping you connect to us on twitter. we do read every single one of the messages you post there or on facebook. make sure you join us every week for "your money" saturdays and sundays. you can log on to cnnmoney.com. have a great weekend. >>> seven steps to saving money, we start your home from your thermostat to your dishwasher. >>> a mirror mission goes viral. now in the running to become the most popular video in the world. we'll show you our other contenders in our 3:00 p.m. hour. >>> changes in health care went into effect this week. coming up we'll tell you how those changes could impact your next doctor's visit. you're in the cnn newsroom, where the news unfolds live this saturday. >>> up first, national security and the case of a yemeni american cleric by the name of anwar al aawaki. he's suing to prevent the u.s. government from targeting awlaki. he's been linked to al qaeda. the u.s. believes he's hiding in yemen. chris lawrence has been following all of this from washington. what
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
. who was picked up this time and why are u.s. authorities worried. jenna: in the bottom box, where more democrats are breaking ranks with party leaders. all that and much more straight ahead. jon: a huge hurricane batters the tiny island of bermuda. igor hits with 95-mile an hour winds. janice dean is watching this thing in the faction weather center. >> reporter: it could have been a lot worse. center of igor40 miles west of bermuda, last night around 11:00 local times. winds ar68 miles per hour gusting to 93. tropical force storm winds extending 350 miles from the center of the storm. this is a huge, huge event. hay had tropical-force storm winds for at least 24 hours on the island of bermuda. there doesn't seem to be a lot of damage or injuries reported, but igor did cause two deaths in the caribbean. there is the storm right now off screen because we don't have the satellite picture for you. you can see how huge this storm is, still a hurricane but expected to become extra tropical within the next day or so. so there is the path, racing across portions of canada. a tropical storm wa
't be swept away by the surf. ocean city's mayor, rick, so that spo to us after one of his daily briefings by his emergency management team. >> the beach will be pretty rough. the surf, we'll see the erosion. we'll keep people out of the surf. we have restricted access to the surf at this time. beach patrol will be on duty at 5:00. the beach is open. we are restricting access to the surf and we will probably continue to do that throughout the day, throughout the duration of the storm. >> reporter: look at the size and the force of these waves. the mayor says that even after this storm passes, the sun returns, the beach patrol may put restrictions on the use of the ocean, allowing you in only up to your waist because the rip tides could be dangerous. in ocean city, maryland, chris gordon. news4. >> that's exactly right. the rip currents are going to be dangerous. not just during the day today but most likely tomorrow and probably into sunday as well. and i was talking to the life guards here earlier and they were saying, they're going to come out tomorrow morning as they normally do around
beginning to end. you go from phase one and as soon as you think your body's got used to it, boom, he switches it to phase two and then to phase three. you just have these three-week intervals and then a week of break in between and then you come back. you just feel stronger than ever and it's, uh, he's just thought it all out. it's like he's invented the wheel of fitness and there's no reason to try and reinvent this wheel because it works. [♪...] ...i used to only be able to do like two of these. now they're my favorite. it's not easy by any means but if you commit to it, the way that you feel after each workout is amazing 'cause you feel like you've just conquered the world and you're excited to even go back and do it the next time. the proof is right there. you do the workouts, you get it done, it's the body of your life and don't try and convince yourself it's not what you want because anybody that gets here will never look back and say i didn't want to be there. you want this, so then get it done. >> announcer: this guy got it done. she got it done. he got it done. and on and
get a ticket, never talk or text while driving, respect the privilege of using your car, and never n signed by you, jonathan. i think that's so great. you did this because of the loss of derek? >> yeah, yeah. one--one thing we were paranoid about was jonathan driving. and jonathan even had a hard time driving after that. so i just felt that on his honor, if he signed the contract, he would obey those laws. >> that's amazing. oprah: yeah. so you were the first no phone zone. >> yes. yes. oprah: yeah. you were a no phone zone before we did. >> you know, i have--yeah. i have to tell you, i--you know, you always have that moment when you're on television about whether or not you're going to share something that's so personal. and there's always that moment where you can make that decision to do it oprah: or not to. >> or toh: you say, "do i cr oprah: you say, "do i crack myself open for the world?" >> right, exactly. do i crack myself open for the world? and if i do, why? what can come of it? and so, i'm so sorry for your loss, and i know that grief is not a straight path. i know it's li
. the heat is still coming back at us. we do have patches of fog along the coast, that's the only place you will notice a little cooling today. even then we're only cooling to the 70s. a nice afternoon along the beaches. yesterday we were in the 80s at the beaches. notice it's a little cooler but still a nice day there. mid and upper 90s in the warmer spots there and tomorrow a bit warmer. summer, but now things are heating up. still hot over florida with readings around 90s. 60s and mid 70s here. >>> a megachurch will give its pastor a chance to address the church for the first time since allegations that he lured young men into sex with gifts and travel. ron? >> reporter: good morning. these allegations have stunned this congregation of 25,000 members, especially in light of eddie long's silence. silence he's breaking today. >> somebody needs to celebrate that moment. >> he's used to having audiences hang on his every word, but today it's likely to be wrapped with tension like never before. he was sued in court by four former members of his church and satellite church for pressuring them
. president obama addresses the nation as the u.s. combat mission ends in iraq. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get the analysis of mark shields and david brooks. >> lehrer: and margaret warner in baghdad examines the challenges iraqis still face in their daily lives. >> woodruff: then, from mexico city, we learn the latest on the arrest of an alleged drug lord from jason beaubien of npr. >> lerher: we have another in john merrow's reports on the washington, d.c., schools. tonight he looks at a new test for teachers. >> how can you possibly have a system where the vast majority of adults are running around thinking i'm doing an excellent job when what we're producing for kids is 8% success. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown updates the story of new orleans musician and scholar michael white, five years after katrina. >> i went through a serious period of depression, of anger, of many different kinds of emotions. and then i came to realize the most valuable thing that i have i never lost. it's inside. it's that music tradition. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on to
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
intercepted by u.s. intelligence. the plan reportedly modelled after the 2008 mumbai attacks, remember those in india and set to focus on western tourists staying in france, england and germany. julie kirtz is live in washington for us with the developing details. >> that's right. western intelligence agencies had credible intelligence that mumbai style attack was planned to target western tourists, as you said, likely americans staying in western hotels in france, england and germany. the attackers were allegedly of pakistani or algerian origin and trained in pakistan's tribal areas. u.s. intelligence decided to leak the information according to one source as a disruption tactic. the threat was credible and the concern was that it would evolve. at this point, there have been no arrests, gretchen, according to our information, officials are still working to investigate this plot. a big concern is that the plotters were modeling their european assault on the 2008 attack in mumbai, india, when armed gunmen, as you remember, killed more than 200 people in coordinated attacks there. several sour
>>> hey, guys. well, glad you joined us today. we had a great show and back here tomorrow. meanwhile, that does it for us. let's head back down to atlanta and john. >> thanks very much, kiran. the news continues here on cnn with kyra phillips. >> so nice to have you here. >> good morning. >> we all know why. you had a chance to catch up with some old buddies you haven't seen in, what? three decades. >> been a long time. not three decades. >> what was so special for me, not only to see how excited you were to team up with them but how excited rush was to see you and coming up on stage and jam, we had to top off the show with this. ♪ >> i guess you could qualify that as geezer rock. >> you said that was, like, the highlight -- a highlight of your life. >> my musical life. there are lots of other highlights in my life, of course. >> i hope so. >> but in terms of a frustrated guitarist and had a dream, i know you wanted to be a country singer, you know, to be able to exercise that jones even for four minutes playing limelight with them on stage -- >> it is great. >> an awful
-- they should have enough capital to cover all of their losses. host: ok, thank you. republican line. calling us from los angeles, at an early hour. caller: i wanted to comment. i don't think the government should help any firm, and there are no firms that are too large to fail. there are perfect bankruptcy laws that are printed on the books. we just have to let the strongest firms survive and those of that for some reason cannot maintain their costs, you have to let them go. we cannot interfere with our market system. host: thank you for your call. i mentioned about candidates. some candidates picking up on this theme. here is just one example. cathy rodgers, washington's fifth congressional district. on her website, she has a series of pledges should see is putting forward. no. 5, reversed the wall street bailout. saying she had voted against the $700 billion tarp the bill and now our goal should be to make sure something like tarp never happens again. no company is too big to fail. the only thing to big to fail as america itself. one candidate picking up on this theme of bailouts. let us go n
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
was carrying three viable embryos. one more than their health insurance was willing to cover. >> they called us, you know, and said, well, congratulations on your pregnancy and we'll be happy to buy in the insurance once you reduce, let us know when you reduce the twins. we're like, what? >> reporter: reduction means terminating one of the embryos in utero. staggering moral dilemma. >> we can't proceed without insurance, this could destroy us. i tell you, man, i tried for four years to get a heartbeat in that ultrasound, you finally realize that this is a life. i mean, i changed my whole point of view about abortion, about everything. >> reporter: luckily, it was a decision they didn't have to make. christie got them on her personal health care plan which covers multiple births. when it came time to deliver by cesarean section, scotch and todd were at the hospital alongside christie and her husband eric. >> they said, we're starting in five minutes. it was boom! we got the first one. what? you know, it was -- and then it was 9:40, 9:41, 9:42. bam, bam, bam. >> while you're processing your first
, we'll find it. when they delivered mom's power chair, i expected they'd show her how to use it once or twice. that man stayed for hours! whatever it takes, as long as it takes. that's our guarantee. why do we go to < uch great lengths? because making you mobile is our mission. we'llwork wit your doctor. we'll work with medicare and lçur private insurance. we'll even service your scooter anywhere in the country. call the sco÷"er store today. >>> welcome back, everybody. former british prime minister tony blair attended wednesday's mideast peace talks. and while in washington he spoke with "this week" anchor christiane amanpour. >> the two talked about the prospects in the middle east, george w. bush, and even princess diana. >> reporter: the interview coincides with the release of his memoir, "a journey." tony blair explained that he sees the key to breaking the impasse in the middle east. you say the biggest problem with the middle east peace process is that no one has ever gripped it long enough or firmly enough. the gripping is intermittent and intermittent won't do, it doesn't
: he's used to audiences hanging ones i every word. today eddie long's congregation is likely to be rapt in attention like never before. members of his church and a satellite church in north carolina allegedly pressuring them into sex after they reached the legal age of concept. >> manipulation starts at 14 or 15 so basically they are indoctrinated into this man and then he goes forward with the next phase. so the law may not recognize that as child molestation, but manipulation of someone like this and abusing the pastoral relationship this way is not consent. >> reporter: long avoided the public spotlight, issuing messages through a spokesperson and his attorney who read a statement on a nationally syndicated radio talk show. >> let me be clear. the charges against me and new birth are false. i have devoted my life to helping others and these false allegations hurt me deeply. but my faith is strong and the truth will emerge. >> reporter: debate on air and online has been passionate on both sides with the motives behind the lawsuits taking center stage. 20-year-old maurice ro
saying i had no idea, the woman saying you used your sister's documents to file the paperwork necessary, whitman saying we had no idea, as soon as we found out we immediately suspended her. if you want to hear more from meg whitman, she'll be interviewed on "good morning america." should be an interesting one to say the least. >> we'll be right back. [croaking] let's turn over this log. yeah! both: whoa! i like the big black ones. i like the brown wiggly ones. mmm. i like the green crunchy ones myself. whoa. get out and explore nature. there are surpris everywhere. go to discovertheforest.org. [burps] anyone up for dessert? >>> welcome back, everybody. the worlds of high fashion and high technology have always been, well, cut from a different cloth. >> for people having any time, anywhere access to the internet, it months surprise the future of fashion is digital. here's daniel sea bearing. >> reporter: most of the saints during fashion week are analog. silicon valley entrepreneurs are trying to bridge the catwalk with the desk top. in this case, the ipad. in a sense the web is the new
, sending concentrated sunshine on the poolside patrons. >>> good morning. and thanks for being with us. well, get ready for a drencher, up and down the east coast today, with air delays stretching nationwide. >> it's all because of a powerful storm system, already spawning possible tornadoes and tearing apart trees. we begin coverage now with emily schmidt. >> reporter: it's hard to know, looking at all of the rain falling all along the east coast. if people are testing the water. >> first tropical storm i've ever been in. so, it's kind of cool. >> reporter: or is the water testing them? north carolina's governor declared a state of emergency, after wilmington at 18 inches of rain since sunday. 4 months worth of water in 100 hours. one inch more would top a record set by hurricane floyd a decade ago. for landscape businesses, it's disappointing. >> it hurts you. like four days in the house doing nothing. >> reporter: for others, it's disorienting. >> i normally make my swing around to go to this box over here. to deliver. and the pavement, you know. >> reporter: clarence williams drive
if they can find a job, and save that space for hardnd criminals that put us at risk. we cannot afford to how's these people. i mean, actually some of them live better than our poor. so i hope this is a turn and i hope other states will take this on. and i really love c-span. it's so important these days. thank you so much. host: thanks for the phone call. we'll keep talking about this. but first, we want to get a quick update about the afghanistan elections. joining us on the phone is paul tate, with reuters and the afghanistan bureau chief. mr. tate, if you could tell us about the headlines that we're seing in this morning. here's one of them. afghan vote marred by irregularities. guest: good morning. it's certainly true there have been thousands of irregularities, we're told, even before voting began. thousands of voter registration cards, ink that was meant to identify people as having voted could be washed off. we even found some kids with bottles of bleach standing outside polling stations showing voters how to wash the ink off. the counting will take a very, very long time. so we're no
, they were inside the building, brought them out, then used a charge to disrupt the device. not make the device explode, but make it so it cannot explode. and that is done with a little bit of a detonation on the part of the bomb squad. so that's what's been going on tonight. it's going to be quite a while before they get this scene clear. but this all started at 1:00 this afternoon when this man by the name of james lee, well known to the people here at discovery as a long-time protester, showed up in the lobby. what james j. lee might not have known during his four-hour siege of the discovery channel building was that for the entire time, police had him literally in their sights. when just before 5:00 he appeared to threaten a hostage, a police sniper pulled his trigger. >> he pulled out the handgun that he came in with, pointed it at one of the hostages. it's unconfirmed now whether he actually fired the weapon or not. but at that point, our tactical units moved in. they shot the suspect. the suspect is deceased. >> reporter: the beginning of the standoff at
at our men today. stand up, guys. stand up and give us a pan. [cheering and applause] oprah: very nice. very nice. and one last thing. one last thing. let's see that big bumper sticker on the side of our van. let's see that bumper sticker! "no phone zone." that's right. it's a no phone zone. go to oprah.com and take the pledge. help save lives. carson, tim and all of our makeover guys already have signed. you signed the pledge. >> i did sign it. oprah: carson signed the pledge. hope you all sign the pledge. >> i signed the pledge. oprah: there's that big signature. thanks, everybody. thanks, carson! thank you, tim. >> oh, i love you, oprah. love you. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] how would i make school a tter place? field trips to the zoo! more basketballs. soccer balls. and a museum! [ growls ] more basketballs. soccer balls! more books. yeah. like just a ton of books. [ girl ] and bks about soft tngs. soft and slimy. [ female announcer ] now clip double box tops for education. fr
. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people who become representative of the larger whole, which was essentially the defection of six million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and the west, from 1915, world war i, until 1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend, and they handed me this as i'm going into the movie. i won't tell you what it was, but i want to read it to you. "every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a constant and cheap source of labor for x country's "booming cities. and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens." do you have any idea what country that is? >> well, it could be almost any -- it could be any country, but i'm thinking the united states and southerners. but i wrote this book w
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)